MEXICAN LEGISLATORS FROM BORDER STATES PASS RESOLUTION
         TO CALL ON CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR GRAY DAVIS TO STOP
            THE PROPOSED WARD VALLEY NUCLEAR WASTE DUMP

January 30, 1999 

Tijuana, Mexico -- Legislators from Mexican border states meeting at the
"Primer Encuentro De Legislaturas De La Frontera Norte" (First Meeting of
Legislators of the Northern Frontier) in Tijuana passed a strongly worded
resolution against the proposed nuclear waste dump at Ward Valley,
California.  Legislators from the five borders states of Baja California,
Sonora, Chihuahua, Nuevo Leon, Coahuila and Tamaulipas passed the
resolution, introduced by State Deputy Alma Gomez of Chihuahua, which calls
upon California Governor Gray Davis to stop the controversial dump project.
Last week state and federal representatives from Mexico's major political
parties met with leaders from the Fort Mojave and Colorado River Indian
Tribes and environmental activists who expressed their concerns about the
proposed nuclear waste dump and the threat to the Colorado River and sacred
Indian lands.

In preparation for Governor Davis' trip to Mexico City next week, Federal
Deputy Carlos Camacho from the state of Chihuahua announced that he will
lead a delegation of legislative representatives to meet with Davis to
discuss Mexican opposition to the Ward Valley dump.

Despite claims by Governor Davis that he seeks to improve relations with
Mexico and protect the environment, the new governor has remained silent on
the dump issue since taking office.  Native American tribes along with
environmental, indigenous rights, scientists and labor organizations have
called upon Governor Davis to stop the dump.  The resolution will add to
the pressure on the Governor to take action.

For the last decade, the nuclear power industry in the United States has
been attempting to bury long-lasting and highly-dangerous radioactive
wastes, mostly from nuclear power reactors, in shallow, unlined trenches
above an aquifer, eighteen miles from the Colorado River, in critical
habitat for the endangered desert tortoise and on land considered sacred
aboriginal territory by the five Colorado River Indian tribes.  Scientists
have warned that nuclear wastes buried at Ward Valley could contaminate the
Colorado River, source of water for 22 million people in California,
Arizona and Mexico.

Just like the recently defeated Sierra Blanca, Texas, nuclear waste dump,
the proposed Ward Valley project threatens the people and environment of
the border region and represents a dangerous trend of toxic and nuclear
waste facilities situated or proposed for the area along the United States
and Mexican frontier.

"Ward Valley and the Colorado River have profound cultural and religious
significance to our people who have lived along the river since time
immemorial.  We believe that the proposed dump is an act of environmental
injustice against our people, our livelihood and our culture," said Nora
Helton, Chairwoman of the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe.